Starman - Stage Two

To continue with the show and tell of creating a series of narrative images, the next stage is to extrapolate (gotta love that word!) images from the words and feelings you get from your brainstorming mentioned in Starman - Stage One.


These images don’t need to be cultivated masterpieces, more like shorthand notes giving you an idea of where you are, what kind of props you might be using in the images and to develop more than one. Once again, do as many as you can mange, rest, do some more . Even the action of refining images you’ve drawn previously will give you either more ideas or a greter sense of that particular image.

The landscapes I’ve used are ones I know are within easy reach of where I’m based and aren’t too arduous should I decide to use some studio equipment, although these constraints shouldn’t hamper your imagination as much can be composited in the final stages.

I’ve used the chair to represent a person/persons who are ‘lost’ in the seas of time and feathers to me, especially white ones have always had the connotation of souls; ethereal, and pure. These are symbols I feel speak to me in this way but that doesn’t mean they will speak to you in the same way. Find and feel out symbols for your own work and then through the images they will speak more of you than anyone else.

I rested from the tiny sketches, only for about an hour or so, allowing the fluff of ideas settle and started again.


As you can see they all protray a person, with a chair, either dragging it or simply being next to it. That emptiness of seat will, hopefully, resonate and create that idea of absence and loss. In the last image, the Starman appeared and he will be the ‘star’ of the show, the protagonist in search of fallen memories.

Now that we have our base thoughts in place a few things can follow. A series must feel the same so what kind of tone or colour might be used? Will the images  be black and white? What costume details are needed for ‘Starman’? What time of day might suit the images best?

The more detail you have about your ideas the easier it is to lock down on the images you will create, and although copying prior planning might not seem creative and wild, the thinking has been before the shoot.

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